Building a mental health friendly workplace

If you want to develop a mental health friendly workplace then it is important that you are ready to play your part.

This tool will help you identify the skills you can contribute to support in building and maintaining a mental health friendly workplace.

Reading time: 5 minutes

What will it do?

This tool will help you identify the skills you can contribute to support in building and maintaining a mental health friendly workplace.

Three steps to take

Get focused on the things that will make the most impact for you.

Step 1

Rate yourself on how well you are doing for each item.

0 being not doing anything at all and 10 being you are investing your full energy in doing it.

When someone else is experiencing a problem, I listen to what they are saying
If someone is struggling with their mental health I know who to point them in the direction to for support
I get regular feedback from colleagues on how they are feeling about their work and how well they’re coping
I provide feedback to colleagues on how I am feeling about work and coping
I understand the signs and symptoms of different mental health problems
I know where the mental health policy can be found
I role model positive mental health behaviours
I include mental health checks in regular conversations
I highlight the importance of physical wellbeing
I encourage colleagues to take breaks

Step 2

From the list identify 2 of your strengths and 2 areas you would like to improve?

With each strength how can you continue to keep promoting them and make the most of them?

With the areas you would like to improve, how can you get started on making the improvement & when do you want to get the actions started and completed?

Step 3

Share your plan with a couple of colleagues to get their views and to make sure you’ve got the support you need to take action.

Your plan

Get a plan Stan.

The basics you need to have in your plan are set out below. As well as these we’d encourage you to:

  • Think about the people who need to know that you’re using this tool and tell them what you’re doing. That way they can support you and won’t think you’re just being weird.
  • Think about the impact you want from using this tool. Depending on your starting point, how hard you work and how ambitious you are, you might not get that impact straight away. So valuing progress rather than perfection will help build your confidence and keep you going.

Plan basics

  1. What are you going to do? (This bit is easy – it’s probably the 3 things listed above.)

    My actions:

  2. When are you going to do these things? (You don’t have to be great to get going, but you better get going if you want to be great)

    My start date:

  3. How often will you be doing them? (Getting great has a lot to do with making things a habit)

    Check-in frequency and dates:

Get serious

The difference between having a plan and making it work is about action. So get this in your diary now. Tell the people who need to know so that they can support you and won’t just think you’re being weird. Do it now.

Remember, it’s progress not perfection. You’re looking for gradual improvement, not for Rome to be built in a day.